Lit-BookQuotes

Ran by @mesheelynn a book lover of sorts likewise

“What is boredom? Endless repetitions, like, for example Navidson’s corridors and rooms, which are consistently devoid of any Myst-like discoveries thus causing us to lose interest. What then makes anything exciting? or better yet: what is exciting? While the degree varies, we are always excited by anything that engages us, influences us or more simply involves us. In those endlessly repetitive hallways and stairs, there is nothing for us to connect with. That permanently foreign place does not excite us. It bores us. And that is that, except for the fact that there is no such thing as boredom. Boredom is really a psychic defense protecting us from ourselves, from complete paralysis, by repressing, among other things, the meaning of that place, which in this case is and always has been horror.”

—   Mark Z. Danielewski, House of Leaves

“A Pelican Wish
The ruminations are mine,
let
the world
be yours.
— For no one. Olympia, Greece.
August 31, 1988”

—   Mark Z. Danielewski, House of Leaves

“[B]
March 14, 1969
Who has never killed an hour? Not casually or without thought, but carefully: a premeditated murder of minutes. The violence comes from a combination of giving up, not caring, and a resignation that getting past it is all you can hope to accomplish. So you kill the hour. You do not work, you do not read, you do no daydream. If you sleep it is not because you need to sleep. And when at last it is over, there is no evidence: no weapon, no blood, and no body. The only clue might be the shadows beneath your eyes or a terribly thin line near the corner of you mouth indicating something has been suffered, that in the privacy of your life you have lost something and the loss is too empty to share.”

—   Mark Z. Danielewski, House of Leaves

“The house is history and history is uninhabited.”

—   Mark Z. Danielewski, House of Leaves

“Explanation is not half as strong as experience but experience is not half as strong as experience and understanding.”

—   Mark Z. Danielewski, House of Leaves

“Make no mistake, those who write long books have nothing to say. Of course those who write short books have even less to say.”

—   Mark Z. Danielewski, House of Leaves

“[I]
May 30, 1991
Do not wake me from this slumber, but be assured that just as I have wept much, I have also wandered many roads with my thoughts. Reminiscent of another film by my eye fell in. Aye.”

—   Mark Z. Danielewski, House of Leaves

“[I]
April 22, 1991
An atrocity sinking into waters of darkness; without order or bars of earth; where light must mean shadow and reason dies in the hold:
((((((((((((Jonah in the belly of the beast))))))))))))”

—   Mark Z. Danielewski, House of Leaves

“[Typed]
February 11, 1984
Is it possible to love something so much, you imagine it wants to destroy you only because it has denied you?”

—   Mark Z. Danielewski, House of Leaves

“[M]aze-treaders, whose vision ahead and behind is severely constricted and fragmented, suffer confusion, whereas maze-viewers who see the pattern whole, from above or in a diagram, are dazzled by its complex artistry. What you see depends on where you stand, and thus, at one and the same time, labyrinths are single (there is one physical structure) and double: they simultaneously incorporate order and disorder, clarity and confusion, unity and multiplicity, artistry and chaos. They may be perceived as a path (a linear but circuitous passage to a goal) or as a pattern ( a complete symmetrical design) … Our perception of labyrinths is thus intrinsically unstable: change your perspective and the labyrinth seems to change.”

—   Mark Z. Danielewski, House of Leaves