Lit-BookQuotes

Ran by @mesheelynn a book lover of sorts likewise

“[Typed]
February 11, 1984
Is it possible to love something so much, you imagine it wants to destroy you only because it has denied you?”

—   Mark Z. Danielewski, House of Leaves

“[M]aze-treaders, whose vision ahead and behind is severely constricted and fragmented, suffer confusion, whereas maze-viewers who see the pattern whole, from above or in a diagram, are dazzled by its complex artistry. What you see depends on where you stand, and thus, at one and the same time, labyrinths are single (there is one physical structure) and double: they simultaneously incorporate order and disorder, clarity and confusion, unity and multiplicity, artistry and chaos. They may be perceived as a path (a linear but circuitous passage to a goal) or as a pattern ( a complete symmetrical design) … Our perception of labyrinths is thus intrinsically unstable: change your perspective and the labyrinth seems to change.”

—   Mark Z. Danielewski, House of Leaves

“[Typed]
March 18, 1989
A maze. Amazing maze. A maze meant … What did it mean? A May zing perhaps. M.A.s in the bush or amidst the maize. Quite amazing huh? Not to worry I am no that impressed either but grant an old man a chance to play.”

—   Mark Z. Danielewski, House of Leaves

“By now you’ve probably noticed that except when safely contained by quotes, Zampano always steers clear of such questionable four-letter language. This instance in particular proves that beneath all that cool pseudo-academic hogwash lurked a very passionate man who knew how important it was to say “fuck” now and then, and say it loud too, relish its syllabic sweetness, its immigrant pride, a great American epic word really, starting at the lower lip, often the very front of the lower lip, before racing all the way to the back of the throat, where it finishes with a great blast, the concussive force of the K catching up then with the hush of the F already on its way, thus loading it with plenty of offense and edge and certainly ambiguity. FUCK. A great by-the-bootstrap prayer or curse if you prefer, depending on how you look at it, or use it, suited perfectly for hurling at the skies or at the world, or sometimes, if said just right, for uttering with enough love and fire, the woman beside you melts inside herself, immersed in all that word-heat.”

—   Mark Z. Danielewski, House of Leaves

“I’m afriad.
It is hungry. It is immortal.
Worse, it knows nothing of whim.”

—   Mark Z. Danielewski, House of Leaves

“Where there is no Echo, there is no description of space or love.
There is only silence.”

—   Mark Z. Danielewski, House of Leaves

“Hollowness only increases the eerie quality of otherness inherent in any echo. Delay and fragmented repetition create a sense of another inhabiting a necessarily deserted place. Strange then how something so uncanny and outside of the self, even ghostly as some have suggested, can at the same time also contain a resilient comfort: the assurance that even if it is imaginary and at best the product of a wall, there is still something else out there, something to stake out in the face of nothingness.”

—   Mark Z. Danielewski, House of Leaves

“Riddles: they either delight or torment. Their delight lies in solutions. Answers provide bright moments of comprehension perfectly suited for children who still inhabit a world where solutions are readily available. Implicit in the riddle’s form is a promise that the rest of the world resolves just as easily. And so riddles comfort the child’s mind which spins wildly before the onslaught of so much information and so many subsequent questions.
The adult world, however, produces riddles of a different variety. They do not have answers and are often called enigmas or paradoxes. Still the old hint of the riddle’s form corrupts these questions by re-echoing the most fundamental lesson: there must be answer. From there comes torment.”

—   Mark Z. Danielewski, House of Leaves

“…but I’ve come to believe errors, especially written errors, are often the only markers left by a solitary life: to sacrifice them is to lose the angles of personality, the riddle of a soul. In this case a very old soul. A very old riddle.”

—   Mark Z. Danielewski, House of Leaves

“Muss en sein?”

—   

Mark Z. Danielewski, House of Leaves

English translate: Must it be?